My Air, My Health: An EPA/HHS Challenge

Submission Deadline

Submissions are Closed

Prizes

  • Phase I Finalists (up to four) $15,000 each
  • Phase II Winner $100,000

First Place

Conscious Clothing

Conscious Clothing logo

Team Members

David Kuller, Gabrielle Savage Dockterman, Dot Kelly
Runner-Up

HabitatMap

HabitatMap  logo

Team Members

Michael Heimbinder, Carlos Restrepo, George D. Thurston, Michael Taylor, Andrzej Grzesik, Joshua Schapiro
Runner-Up

Philips

Philips logo

Team Members

Guy Shechter, Mark Aloia, Arpana Sali, Ronald Wolf, Johan Marra, Wouter Van Gennip

Recent Updates

Congratulations to Team Conscious Clothing for winning the My Air My Health Challenge!

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Congratulations to the four finalists!
Finalist 1: Guy Schechter, Ph.D., Mark Aloia, Ph.D., Johan Marra, Ph.D., Arpana Sali, and Ronald Wolf, Ph.D., from Philips Healthcare (Andover, Mass.)
Finalist 2: Michael Heimbinder, HabitatMap, Michael Taylor, Carnegie Mellon University, Carlos Restrepo, Ph.D., New York University, George Thurston, Sc.D., New York University (Brooklyn, N.Y.)
Finalist 3: Gabrielle Savage Dockterman, Angel Devil Productions, Dot Kelly, Shearwater Design, David Kuller, AUX (Carlisle, Mass.)
Finalist 4: Aaron Hechmer (El Cerrito, Calif.)

Two Honorable Mentions were also selected:
Rajiv Totlani (Frisco, Texas)
Peter Sotory (Raleigh, N.C.)

Background

Abstract
How do we connect personal devices for testing and reporting of both air quality and linked physiological data? Such a system would enable not only high-resolution mapping of pollutant concentrations, but also support research and reporting of individual physiological responses related to the pollutant.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of Health and Human Service (HHS) [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC)] envision a future in which powerful, affordable, and portable sensors provide a rich awareness of environmental quality, moment-to-moment physiological changes, and long-term health outcomes. Health care will be connected to the whole environment, improving diagnosis, treatment, and prevention at all levels.

This challenge is open only to Solvers who are individuals, teams or businesses with their permanent residences or primary places of business in the United States. More details are included in the challenge description.

This Challenge requires only a written proposal.

Summary

Environmental and public health are closely related and complementary fields—and closer understanding is needed of those connections. New, affordable, sensitive and portable sensors and monitors have the potential to transform the way we measure and interpret the influence of pollution on health. These technologies can provide a picture that is more detailed and more personal, with dramatic implications for health care, air quality oversight, and individuals’ control over their own environments and health.

Plans to develop personal devices are required – these must sensitively and frequently measure air quality, along with one or more physiological markers linked to the air quality metric that is measured. The system should be designed with input from a community or target population that would benefit from the solution. A design for a personal integrated system is required, together with a development plan and a proposal for a proof of concept study.

Designs and development plans are required for integrated sensor systems that will detect:

  • Air pollutants - Particulates or individual chemical species
  • Physiological markers - Health metrics with a citation-supported link to the proposed air pollutants to be measured

The system should also enable transmission of these data, together with time and location stamps, to a central resource. Existing communication architecture and transmission devices (e.g. cellular handsets and networks) should be used to transmit data.

This is Phase 1 of a 2 Phased challenge: Your system designs (sensor & communication systems) and development plans (paths to prototype and proof-of-concept data) are requested. Up to four winning Solvers or Solver teams will each be awarded $15,000 at the end of Phase 1 and asked to develop a prototype system in Phase 2 that can be used to generate proof-of concept data. Phase 1 winners will also be invited to a workshop to present their concepts and it is intended that they will receive coaching from an expert panel of thought leaders, and receive guidance regarding potential funding sources and entrepreneurial mentors. In the second phase of this Challenge program, Phase 1 winners will compete for a prize of $100,000.

This is a Theoretical Challenge that requires only a written proposal to be submitted. The Challenge award will be contingent upon theoretical evaluation of the proposal by the Seeker. To receive an award, the Solvers will not have to transfer their exclusive IP rights to the Seeker. Instead, they will grant to the Seeker non-exclusive license to practice their solutions.

Description

The Seeker wishes to enable location-specific, near-real-time monitoring and reporting of air pollutants (particulates or individual chemical species) and related physiological parameters, using a personal, portable integrated system. The intent is to use such devices to increase the level of information about local air quality, and to enable more conclusive analysis of links between air pollutant levels and their associated physiological effects.

Many of the first steps toward this future have already been taken. Prototype projects have developed portable air quality and physiologic sensors, and experimental analysis tools for handling data that is higher quantity, but often lower quality, than more traditional monitoring techniques. The “My Air, My Health Challenge” aims to build on this foundation. We are seeking solutions that integrate data from portable physiological and air quality monitors, producing a combined picture that is meaningful and usable. The statutory authority for this challenge competition is Section 105 of the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010 (Public L. No 111-358) and section 103 of the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7403. This challenge addresses the mission of the NIEHS to conduct and support programs with respect to factors in the environment that affect human health, directly or indirectly. 42 U.S.C. 285.

Many studies have documented links between air pollutants and physiological effects. Although the Seeker is open to any relevant coupling of air quality and physiological measures, some examples of relevant findings are summarized here.

The “My Air, My Health Challenge” is a multidisciplinary call to innovators and software developers (“Solvers”) to enable near-real-time, location-specific monitoring and reporting of air pollutants and potentially related physiological parameters, using a personal/ portable integrated system to assess connections between the two (“sensor systems”). The required system design must be capable of linking air pollutant concentrations with physiological data, providing geocoded and time-stamped files in an easy to use format, and transmitting this data via existing networks to a central data repository. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of this challenge, solvers are highly encouraged to form teams drawing on multiple relevant expertise, either on their own or taking advantage of the InnoCentive Team Project Room functionality.

This Challenge is Phase 1 of a structured campaign. The Phase 1 requirements are summarized below:

  1. Identify one or more physiological measurements and airborne pollutants (chemical species and/or particulates) and propose a plausible link between them
  2. Provide evidence to support a plausible and physiologically meaningful relationship between the marker and pollutant in a defined population
  3. Propose a prototype design and development plan for an integrated multi-sensor and data management system, the components of which may be easily worn and/or carried by individuals within the defined target community/population
  4. Conceptualize data generation, management (may include processing & on-board storage), and transmission functionality of the device
  5. Propose a small-scale proof-of-concept study to validate the proposed prototype.
  6. Study design process must demonstrate input from the target community/ population

The Seeker believes that sensors and enabling technologies feasible for integration into the required device design are currently available or under development. Solvers will not be required to invent novel sensor technologies. It is also important to note that a prototype design is required and that the Seeker readily accepts that any prototype produced in the later invitational Challenge will require further development. A polished, ready to market product is not expected. Instead, the Seeker wishes to foster significant improvements over the state of the art.

Following the award decision, Phase I finalist teams will be invited to a workshop that will offer resources and guidance, for further developing their sensor systems. We are still working to gather the highest-impact contributors to this event, but it will likely include discussion of:

  • Priorities and opportunities in portable sensors
  • Best practices for meeting community needs with sensor projects
  • Opportunities for securing investment

This event is intended not only to maximize the quality of Phase II submissions, but to support all finalists in effectively developing and marketing their products during and after the challenge.

  • Data collection and transfer functionality is likely to form a critical part of both this Phase 1 Challenge and Phase 2 production of a prototype system. The Challenge Sponsors suggest that a typical transmitted data package might contain the following, but Solvers should design the data/metadata package content to suit the proposed use case, pollutant, sensor technologies and user population
  • Device unique identifier (including information relevant to device-specific data collection constraints, such as those of a particular cell phone model) – bidirectional communication from/with the device is desired, but not mandatory
  • Geo stamps – either device locations at sample acquisition start and end, or if appropriate, path information for full sample collection. Spatial resolution must be appropriate to pollutants and conditions of interest, as well as speed of collector
  • Date/time stamps - sample acquisition start and end. Temporal resolution must be appropriate to pollutants and conditions of interest, as well as speed of collector
  • Time stamp - sample data transmission
  • Sample assay raw data (absolute values or score) – pollutant
  • Sample assay raw data (absolute values or score) – phys. Marker
  • Sample assay processed data (if data is processed on-board device) - pollutant, marker, or combined score

Phase I proposals will be evaluated by an expert panel of government scientists and thought leaders in the field of air quality research. This panel will score proposals in a blinded fashion using the Scoring System described in the "Evaluation" tab (found in the left-hand navigation tool).

Timeline

  • Phase I Submission Period Begins: June 5, 2012
  • Phase I Submission Period Closes: October 5, 2012
  • Phase I Winners Announced: Week of November 12, 2012
  • Phase II Submission Period Begins: November 19, 2012
  • Phase II Submission Period Closes: May 9, 2013

Review Panel

    • Edward Avol
    • University of Southern California
    • Erin Haynes, PhD
    • University of Cincinnati
    • Michael Jerrett, PhD
    • University of California Berkeley
    • Joel Kaufman MD
    • University of Washington
    • Patrick Kinney, PhD
    • Columbia University
    • Santosh Kumar, PhD
    • University of Memphis
    • Helen Suh, PhD
    • NORC/Havard
    • Edward Zellers, PhD
    • University of Michigan

Evaluation Criteria

PHASE I Scoring System for Solver Proposals

  1. Strength of evidence &/or argumentation regarding the linkage between air pollutant and physiological effect.
    N.B. No weighting will be given to the number of people within the target population – niche applications are equally as interesting as globally applicable applications
  2. Viability of proposed sensor technologies to detect and quantify pollutants and their effects, and provide physiologically relevant health and air quality data
    • Pollutant sensor accuracy / precision, robustness, and sampling frequency
    • Physiological sensor accuracy / precision, robustness, and sampling frequency
    • Viability of the proposed algorithm(s) for data processing, if any
    • Viability of the proposed data reporting ability
  3. Viability of the proposed project plan for producing a prototype:
    • Technical viability of the proposed project
    • Perceived ability of the proposing team to execute the plan
  4. Viability of the proposed instrument design as a wearable/portable device:
    • Minimally invasive/intrusive
    • Robustness/Low maintenance
  5. Potential significance of technology and eventual benefit to target population(s)
  6. Viability of the proposed proof-of-concept study (low complexity is preferred) [Note: Does the Solver describe how the study replicates the use case & how the study would be conducted, including sample size, target population, metrics and timeframe?]
  7. Appropriate use of community input in designing proof-of-concept study
    • Health-environment connection of interest addresses community concerns and needs
    • Research plans include appropriate community involvement and feedback throughout

Submission Requirements

Eligibility: This challenge is open to any Solver who is (1) an individual or team of U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the United States who are 13 years of age and over (with the permission of a parent/guardian if under 18 years of age), or (2) an entity incorporated in and maintaining a primary place of business in the United States. Foreign citizens can participate as employees of an entity that is properly incorporated in the U.S. and maintains a primary place of business in the U.S. Solvers may submit more than one entry. More details regarding eligibility are available within the Detailed Challenge description.

Eligibility for Phase 2 is conditional upon being selected as a Phase 1 Finalist. Eligibility for a prize award is contingent upon fulfilling all requirements set forth herein. An individual, team, or entity that is currently on the Excluded Parties List (https://www.epls.gov/) will not be selected as a Finalist or Winner.

Employees of EPA, HHS, and the reviewers or any other company or individual involved with the design, production, execution, or distribution of the challenge and their immediate family (spouse, parents and step-parents, siblings and step-siblings, and children and step-children) and household members (people who share the same residence at least three (3) months out of the year) are not eligible to participate.

An individual or entity may not be a Federal entity or Federal employee acting within the scope of their employment. Federal employees seeking to participate in this challenge outside the scope of their employment should consult their ethics official prior to developing a submission. An individual or entity shall not be deemed ineligible because the individual or entity used Federal facilities or consulted with Federal employees during a competition if the facilities and employees are made available to all individuals and entities participating in the competition on an equitable basis.

Federal grantees may not use Federal funds to develop COMPETES Act challenge applications unless consistent with the purpose of their grant award. (Grantees should consult with their cognizant Grants Management Official to make this determination.) Federal contractors may not use Federal funds from a contract to develop COMPETES Act challenge applications or to fund efforts in support of a COMPETES Act challenge submission.

Proposals should meet the following Technical Requirements:

  1. Level of Focus for Health/Pollution connections: Systems must track airborne pollutants and physiological parameters for a known or plausible health-pollution link. Solvers must be able to justify their chosen combination with research citations and to optimize the air sampling parameters (volume, frequency, etc.) and physiological measurement parameters to provide resolution appropriate to the specific pollutant, or combination of pollutants, and related health implications
  2. Sensor development: Solvers are not expected to develop novel sensors for this Challenge, but are not restricted to commercially available sensors. They may use sensors that are currently in the development or piloting stage, but must show that the sensor will be ready to use in functional tests—at least at a small scale—in time for the Phase 2 proof-of-concept demonstration. Instruments must be well characterized in terms of precision, accuracy and sensitivity. Integrated sensor systems must be able to transmit data to the central repository (in real time, or store and forward) using existing data networks (e.g. 3G, LTE, or WiFi), or able to connect with personal devices (e.g., smartphones) that have such capability. Solvers must enable appropriate calibration and error checking capabilities, although these need not be onboard the portable monitoring components. Encryption of transmitted data, self-calibration capabilities, on-board error diagnostics, and real-time user feedback are desirable but not required
  3. Data Requirements and Constraints: Data transmitted by the integrated devices, either directly to a data network or to a personal device with suitable functionality (e.g., smart phone), must enable the following to be understood from transmitted data:
    • Indicators of device functionality, including any results of automated system diagnostics, calibrations, or error logs
    • The device unique identifier, including any paired communication device identifier (particularly important if bidirectional communication functionality is proposed)
    • Time and date the data were collected / measurements made (start & end)
    • The location of the device during data collection – if sampling occurs over several minutes or longer Solvers should consider that users may be using transportation and that analysis should ideally show locations between sample start & end
    • Raw measurement data (quantitative or semi-quantitative) as well as any processed data or combined
    • Whether the device is being worn/carried and if physiological data is being collected (context awareness and user compliance). It may be that the device is active, but not correctly deployed. Solvers must demonstrate how the device would detect and react to this situation so that any data generated could either be not transmitted, or be easily identified after transmission
    • The preferred data transmission file format is comma separated value (.csv) or variants thereof. Alternatively, encrypted binary files are also acceptable. Encryption keys/codes should be provided to the Challenge Sponsors so that data can be accessed at the central data repository (provided by the Sponsors)
    • Solvers are required to identify privacy and security issues in their proposed projects, and describe solutions for resolving them even though these aspects of the plan need not be completely finalized. Likewise, ethical issues should be discussed and solutions proposed e.g. functionality informing sensor carriers of high pollutant exposure
  4. Pollutant Focus: Solvers will be required to include at least one air pollution metric—although at their discretion they may include multiple air pollution metrics and/or other environmental metrics such as noise level and UV exposure. The focus, however, will be on chemical and/or particulate air pollutants
  5. Physiological Parameter Focus: Solvers will be required to include at least one physiological metric—although at their discretion they may include multiple physiological metrics and/or other person-oriented metrics such as behaviors and social interactions. The focus, however, will be on physical parameters (e.g., heart rate, breathing, pulse oxygenation) and their connection to pollutants
  6. Physical Guidelines for Sensors: At least one component of the sensor system must be wearable or portable, and all components should be minimally intrusive. The overall sensor system must focus on personal and local metrics (i.e., measuring air quality in the immediate vicinity of the wearer). Wearable components must be the right size and weight for their target audience (e.g., no more than 300 g for a child). Sampling frequency and area must be appropriate to the pollutants and physiological metrics of interest, as well as to the context of data collection (e.g., by walkers, cyclists, or passengers on public transportation)
  7. Measurement Guidelines for Sensors: The following parameters of the detection technologies must be appropriate to both the proposed pollutant(s) and the physiological metric(s):
    • Accuracy & Precision – measurement data must be sufficiently able to measure the actual level of the pollutant or physiological metric, and sufficiently reproducible, to allow discrimination of health-relevant changes
    • Lower Limit of detection – sensitivity of the technologies must be sufficient to detect relevant concentrations of the proposed pollutants and the relevant physiological metrics
    • Upper Limit of Detection – the proposed technologies must be able to quantify pollutants and physiological measures at the highest levels expected to be encountered

    If processing of the data is required in order to achieve this (e.g., normalization, increasing signal-to-noise ratios), the Solver must include the algorithm and its scientific basis (i.e., previously collected data and/or appropriate citations) in their report. Alternatively, centralized processing that enables parsing of local data in order to increase data robustness and reduce false positive signals, may be used. If such an approach is determined to be useful, Solvers must outline suitable strategies and /or boundary criteria. In either case, Solvers must communicate the overall uncertainty level of the final system output. The sensor system must include an on-board data buffer for when network access is unavailable, and may also at the Solver’s discretion include personal media to which data may be downloaded for permanent or temporary storage by sensor carriers. Open source hardware and software are desired but not required.

  8. Community Involvement: The sensor project must address a need in a specific community or population. In addition to scientific evidence supporting that need, Solvers must also seek and document community input. Representatives of the affected community should provide feedback on the pilot project both during conceptualization (Phase I), and throughout the pilot study (Phase II). This is not intended to override the Solvers’ scientific judgment on technical issues, but to ensure that the project is respectful of local knowledge, community identity, and needs. Pilot studies must include feedback to the community regarding both technical success (e.g., whether sensors performed as planned) and results (e.g., any correlations found in the data).

Project Criteria: (viewable by Solvers who signed user agreement for your Challenge)

This is a Theoretical Challenge that requires only a written proposal to be submitted.

Submissions must include the following information:

  1. Descriptions of the air pollutant(s) (particulates or individual chemical species) and associated physiological markers that will be used to measure their effect(s) on humans
  2. A justification of the linkage of the pollutant(s) and physiological effects, including reference to literature or existing study data
  3. A justification of the proposed sampling modality, sampling window, and sampling frequency as relevant to the linked pollutant(s) and physiological measure(s). This may need to include e.g. temporal offsets between pollutant measurement and physiological effects
  4. Describe technologies/devices that could be integrated to form a personal or portable system for recording and communicating air pollutant and physiological data. Descriptions must include:
    • Sensor technology to be used (physical characteristics of hardware, sensitivity/accuracy information)
    • A high-level design of the prototype integrated instrument, including:
      • Projected weight and dimensions
      • Air sampling volumes and sampling frequencies
      • Power sources and requirements
    • Description of data management plans and algorithms required to process the data in order to support a plausible and physiologically meaningful relationship between measured pollutants and physiological changes
    • Descriptions of data transmission capabilities, including:
      • Transmission methods and modalities
      • Required data networks
      • Frequency of transmission (data packages per unit time)
      • Data package size and format
      • Any possible encryption functionality
      • Data caching or storage functionality should data networks be unavailable (either local to device or within a separate transmission device e.g. smart phone)
    • Project plan for development of the required system and a proof-of-concept study (including study methods, location, and population)
  5. Description of data package contents. This should include a data dictionary that describes each data variable included in the package. The data dictionary must include a short textual description of each variable, number of significant figures, units, range (lowest and highest expected values that are considered reliable) and missing value code(s)
  6. A description of the Solver/Team’s expertise & experience relevant to the Challenge, including a description of facilities to which they have access relevant to producing a prototype system

The proposal should not include any personal identifying information (name, username, company, address, phone, email, personal website, resume, etc.) The core proposal document should not exceed 15 pages and should contain sufficient information for primary evaluation, although additional supporting data and addenda are welcomed.

The Challenge award will be contingent upon theoretical evaluation of the proposal by the Seeker.

To receive an award, the Solvers will not have to transfer their exclusive IP rights to the Seeker. Instead, they will grant to the Seeker non-exclusive license to practice their solutions.

Terms & Conditions

OFFICIAL RULES

NO PURCHASE OR PAYMENT NECESSARY TO ENTER OR TO WIN.  A PURCHASE WILL NOT IMPROVE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING.  VOID WHERE PROHIBITED.

SPONSOR:  The sponsor of this Challenge is the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology ("Sponsor").

ADMINISTRATOR:  The administrator of the Challenge is Health 2.0, LLC, 650 Delancey St, #221, San Francisco, CA 94107 ("Administrator")

CHALLENGE DESCRIPTION:  The Challenge Phase I begins at 1:00 PM Eastern Time on Tuesday, June 5, 2012 and Phase II ends at 11:59 PM Eastern Time on May, 19 2013 ("Challenge Period"). The My Air, My Health: An EPA/HHS Challenge is a call to innovators and software developers (“Solvers”) to enable near-real-time, location-specific monitoring and reporting of air pollutants and potentially related physiological parameters, using a personal/ portable integrated system to assess connections between the two (“sensor systems”).. Three winning applications will be selected based on the evaluation criteria set forth below.  The teams that submit the winning applications will win: Phase I Finalists (up to four): $15,000, Phase II Winner: $100,000.  Entry into the Challenge does not constitute entry into any other challenge or promotion, including, without limitation, other similar challenges or promotions offered by Sponsor and/or Administrator.  By participating in the Challenge, each entrant unconditionally accepts and agrees to comply with and abide by these Official Rules and the decisions of Sponsor, Administrator, and/or the individual advisors, which shall be final and binding in all respects.

ELIGIBILITY:  To be eligible to win a prize under this challenge, an individual or entity: (a) Shall have registered to participate in the competition under the rules promulgated by Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology; (b) Shall have complied with all the requirements under this section; (c)  In the case of a private entity, shall be incorporated in and maintain a primary place of business in the United States, and in the case of an individual, participating in a group, shall be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States and 18 years old or older as of the time of entry; and (d) May not be a Federal entity or Federal employee acting within the scope of their employment.  An individual or entity shall not be deemed ineligible because the individual or entity used Federal facilities or consulted with Federal employees during a competition if the facilities and employees are made available to all individuals and entities participating in the competition on an equitable basis.  Employees of Sponsor, Administrator, each of their affiliates, and/or any other individual or entity associated with the development, evaluation, or administration of the Challenge as well as members of such persons' immediate families (spouses, children, siblings, parents), and persons living in the same household as such persons, whether or not related, are not eligible to participate in the Challenge.

HOW TO ENTER:  To enter:  (a)  Shall have registered to participate in the competition under the rules promulgated by the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology ("Submission"); (b) go to the website located at www.health2challenge.org (the "Challenge Website"), complete the Official Application Form to officially register for the competition; (c) once registered you will receive additional instructions to submit your entry, a video demonstrating the Submission's capabilities and functionality, and an electronic slide presentation describing the submission according to the instructions posted on the Challenge Website.  You may only enter as part of a team.  Teams must include no less than two (2) people and each team member must be clearly identified on the team's Official Entry Form to be eligible.  All participants are required to provide written consent to the rules upon or before submitting an entry.  Submissions must be received during the Challenge Period to be eligible.  Administrator is the official timekeeper for the Challenge.  No substitutions of new versions of Submissions will be accepted under any circumstances once the original Submission is submitted for consideration.  In the event of a dispute regarding the identity of the individual or team who actually submitted the entry cannot be resolved to Sponsor's and/or Administrator's satisfaction, the affected entry will be deemed ineligible.  Except as otherwise stated in these Official Rules, personal information collected in connection with the Challenge will be used by Sponsor in accordance with Sponsor's privacy policy and by Administrator in accordance with Administrator's privacy policy available on the Website and with any additional consent given by an entrant at the time of entry.  All entry information and materials, including any copy of the Submission submitted to Sponsor, become the property of Sponsor and will not be acknowledged or returned.  Proof of submission is not considered proof of delivery to or receipt of such entry.  Furthermore, Sponsor and Administrator shall have no liability for any Submission that is lost, intercepted, or not received by Sponsor and/or Administrator.  Sponsor and Administrator assume no liability or responsibility for any error, omission, interruption, deletion, theft, or destruction or unauthorized access to, or alteration of, Submissions.

REPRESENTATIONS AND WARRANTIES/INDEMNIFICATION:  By participating in the Challenge, each entrant represents, warrants, and covenants as follows: (a) entrant is the sole author, creator, and owner of the Submission; (b) the Submission is not the subject of any actual or threatened litigation or claim; (c) the Submission does not and will not violate or infringe upon the intellectual property rights, privacy rights, publicity rights, or other legal rights of any third party; (d) the Submission does not and will not contain any harmful computer code (sometimes referred to as "malware," "viruses" or "worms"); and (e) the Submission, and entrants use of the Submission, does not and will not violate any applicable laws or regulations, including, without limitation, applicable export control laws and regulations of the U.S. and other jurisdictions.  If the Submission includes any third party works (such as third party content or open source code), entrant must be able to provide, upon Sponsor and/or Administrator's request, all appropriate licenses and releases for such third party works.  In the event entrant cannot provide all required licenses and releases, Sponsor reserves the right, in Sponsor's sole discretion, to disqualify the applicable Submission, or seek to secure the licenses and releases for Sponsor's benefit and allow the applicable Submission to remain in the Challenge.  Entrants will indemnify, defend, and hold harmless Sponsor and Administrator from and against all third party claims, actions, or proceedings of any kind and from any and all damages, liabilities, costs, and expenses relating to or arising from entrant's Submission or any breach or alleged breach of any of the representations, warranties, and covenants of entrant hereunder.  Sponsor and/or Administrator reserves the right to disqualify any Submission that Sponsor and/or Administrator, in its sole discretion, deems to violate these Official Rules.

SUBMISSION LICENSE:  Each entrant retains title and full ownership in and to their Submission.  Entrant expressly reserves all intellectual property rights not expressly granted under this Agreement.  By participating in the challenge, each entrant hereby irrevocably grants to Sponsor and Administrator a limited, non-exclusive, royalty free, worldwide, license and right to reproduce, publicly perform, publicly display, and use the Submission to the extent necessary to administer the challenge, and to publically perform and publicly display the Submission, including, without limitation, for advertising and promotional purposes relating to the challenge.

PUBLICITY RELEASE:  By participating in the Challenge, in addition to any other grants granted herein or which may be granted in any other agreement entered into between Sponsor and/or Administrator, on the one hand, and any entrant in the Challenge, on the other hand, each entrant hereby irrevocably (a) grants to Sponsor and Administrator the right to use such entrant's name, likeness, image, and biographical information in any and all media for any purpose, including, without limitation, advertising and promotional purposes relating to the Challenge and (b) releases Sponsor and Administrator from any liability with respect thereto.

U.S. GOVERNMENT SUPPORT, RIGHTS, AND WAIVER:   Sponsor and Administrator are administering the Challenge with the support of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services pursuant to the American COMPETES Reauthorization Act (the "Act").  Subsection (j) of section 24 of the Act establishes that the Government is prohibited from acquiring an interest in intellectual property developed by a participant in a prize competition, such as the Challenge, without the written consent of the participant.  Registered participants shall be required to agree to assume any and all risks and waive claims against the Federal Government and its related entities, except in the case of willful misconduct, for any injury, death, damage, or loss of property, revenue, or profits, whether direct, indirect, or consequential, arising from their participation in a competition, whether the injury, death, damage, or loss arises through negligence or otherwise. Participants shall be required to obtain liability insurance or demonstrate financial responsibility, in amounts determined by the head of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, for claims by (a) a third party for death, bodily injury, or property damage, or loss resulting from an activity carried out in connection with participation in a competition, with the Federal Government named as an additional insured under the registered participant's insurance policy and registered participants agreeing to indemnify the Federal Government against third party claims for damages arising from or related to competition activities; and (b)    the Federal Government for damage or loss to Government property resulting from such an activity.

WINNER SELECTION/EVALUATION CRITERIA:  A panel of advisors will select a winning Submission from among all eligible entries based on the following evaluation criteria:

PHASE I Scoring System for Solver Proposals

  1. Strength of evidence &/or argumentation regarding the linkage between air pollutant and physiological effect.
    N.B. No weighting will be given to the number of people within the target population – niche applications are equally as interesting as globally applicable applications
  2. Viability of proposed sensor technologies to detect and quantify pollutants and their effects, and provide physiologically relevant health and air quality data
    • Pollutant sensor accuracy / precision, robustness, and sampling frequency
    • Physiological sensor accuracy / precision, robustness, and sampling frequency
    • Viability of the proposed algorithm(s) for data processing, if any
    • Viability of the proposed data reporting ability
  3. Viability of the proposed project plan for producing a prototype:
    • Technical viability of the proposed project
    • Perceived ability of the proposing team to execute the plan
  4. Viability of the proposed instrument design as a wearable/portable device:
    • Minimally invasive/intrusive
    • Robustness/Low maintenance
  5. Potential significance of technology and eventual benefit to target population(s)
  6. Viability of the proposed proof-of-concept study (low complexity is preferred) [Note: Does the Solver describe how the study replicates the use case & how the study would be conducted, including sample size, target population, metrics and timeframe?]
  7. Appropriate use of community input in designing proof-of-concept study
    • Health-environment connection of interest addresses community concerns and needs
    • Research plans include appropriate community involvement and feedback throughout

The evaluation criteria are to be applied in the sole discretion of Sponsor and the individual advisors.  By participating in the Challenge, each entrant into the Challenge acknowledges and agrees that such evaluations may differ from person to person and agrees to be bound by and not challenge the final decisions of Sponsor and the individual advisors.

NOTICE TO WINNERS:  Attempts to notify potential winners will be made using the contact information provided on the winner's Official Entry Form.  Sponsor and Administrator are not responsible for e-mail or other communication problems of any kind.  If, despite reasonable efforts, a potential winner does not respond within five (5) days of the first notification attempt (or a shorter time as exigencies may require), or if the prize or prize notification is returned as unclaimed or undeliverable to such potential winner, such potential winner will forfeit his or her prize and an alternate winner may be selected.  If any potential prize winner is found to be ineligible, or if he or she has not complied with these Official Rules or declines the applicable prize for any reason prior to award, such potential prize winner will be disqualified and an alternate winner may be selected.  Sponsor may successively attempt to contact up to two (2) potential prize winners in accordance with such procedure, and if there is still no confirmed prize winner after such attempts have been made, if any, the applicable prize may go unawarded.

ANTICIPATED NUMBER OF ENTRANTS:  Many will enter, three winning submissions will be selected.  Actual odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received.  Sponsor and Administrator cannot accurately predict the number of entrants who will participate in the Challenge. 

PRIZES:  The winning teams will receive: Phase I Finalists (up to four) - $15,000, Phase II Winner - $100,000.

GENERAL PRIZE CONDITIONS:  The potential winner may be required to execute an Affidavit of Eligibility, a Liability Release and (where imposing such condition is legal) a Publicity Release (collectively "Prize Claim Documents).  If a winner fails or refuses to sign and return all Prize Claim Documents within five (5) days of Sponsor's and/or Administrator's request (or a shorter time as exigencies may require), the winner may be disqualified and an alternate winner may be selected.  No more than the advertised number of prizes will be awarded.  Prizes will be delivered only to an address in the U.S.  No cash alternative or substitution or transfer of prizes will be allowed, except Sponsor reserves the right in its sole discretion to substitute prizes of comparable value, in whole or in part, for any reason.  THE WINNER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR REPORTING AND PAYING ANY INCOME TAXES OR OTHER TAXES THAT MAY APPLY TO ACCEPTING A PRIZE; SPONSOR AND ADMINISTRATOR ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR AND WILL NOT PAY ANY SUCH TAXES.

DATES/DEADLINES:  Because of the unique nature and scope of the Challenge, Sponsor and Administrator reserve the right, in addition to those other rights reserved herein, to modify any dates or deadlines set forth in these Official Rules or otherwise governing the Challenge.

GENERAL LIABILITY RELEASE/FORCE MAJEURE:  Each entrant agrees that Sponsor and Administrator (a) shall not be responsible or liable for any losses, damages, or injuries of any kind (including death) resulting from participation in the Challenge or any Challenge-related activity, or from entrants' acceptance, receipt, possession, use, or misuse of any prize, and (b) have not made any warranty, representation, or guarantee, express or implied, in fact or in law, with respect to any prize, including, without limitation, regarding such prize's merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.  Entrants will indemnify, defend, and hold harmless Sponsor and Administrator from and against all third party claims, actions, or proceedings of any kind and from any and all damages, liabilities, costs, and expenses relating to or arising from entrant's participation in the Challenge.  Sponsor and Administrator assumes no responsibility for any damage to an entrant's computer system which is occasioned by accessing the Website or other Challenge-related websites or participating in the Challenge, or for any computer system, phone line, hardware, software, or program malfunctions, or other errors, failures, delayed computer transmissions, or network connections that are human or technical in nature.  Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, Sponsor and Administrator are not responsible for incomplete, illegible, misdirected, misprinted, late, lost, postage-due, damaged, or stolen entries or prize notifications; or for lost, interrupted, inaccessible, or unavailable networks, servers, satellites, Internet Service Providers, websites, or other connections; or for miscommunications, failed, jumbled, scrambled, delayed, or misdirected computer, telephone, cable transmissions or other communications; or for any technical malfunctions, failures, difficulties, or other errors of any kind or nature; or for the incorrect or inaccurate capture of information, or the failure to capture any information.  Sponsor and Administrator each reserve the right in their sole discretion to disqualify any individual who is found to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the Challenge or Website or other Challenge-related websites, to be acting in violation of these Official Rules, or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike or disruptive manner, or with the intent to disrupt or undermine the legitimate operation of the Challenge, or to annoy, abuse, threaten, or harass any other person, and Sponsor and Administrator each reserve the right to seek damages and other remedies from any such person to the fullest extent permitted by law.  In the event an insufficient number of eligible entries are received or Sponsor and/or Administrator is prevented from awarding the prize or continuing with the Challenge as contemplated herein by any event beyond its control, including, without limitation, fire, flood, natural or man-made epidemic, earthquake, explosion, labor dispute or strike, act of God or public enemy, satellite or equipment failure, riot or civil disturbance, terrorist threat or activity, war (declared or undeclared) or any federal state or local government law, order, or regulation, public health crisis, order of any court or jurisdiction, or other cause not reasonably within Sponsor's control ("Force Majeure"), Sponsor and/or Administrator shall have the right to modify, suspend, or terminate the Challenge.  If the Challenge is terminated for Force Majeure before expiration of the Challenge Period, Sponsor and/or Administrator will (if reasonably possible) select a winner from all eligible, non-suspect entries received as of the date of the event giving rise to the termination.  These Official Rules cannot be modified or amended in any way except in a written document issued in accordance with the law by a duly authorized representative of both Sponsor and Administrator.  The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision of these Official Rules shall not affect the validity or enforceability of any other provision.  In the event that any provision is determined to be invalid or otherwise unenforceable or illegal, these Official Rules shall otherwise remain in effect and shall be construed in accordance with their terms as if the invalid or illegal provision were not contained herein.

GOVERNING LAW/JURISDICTION:  All issues and questions concerning the construction, validity, interpretation, and enforceability of these Official Rules or the rights and obligations of entrants, Sponsor and/or Administrator in connection with the Challenge shall be governed by and construed in accordance with the laws of the State of California without giving effect to any choice of law or conflict of laws rules or provisions.  Any legal claims arising from or relating to the Challenge or these Official Rules must be brought in the federal or state courts located in San Francisco, California.

WINNERS LIST/OFFICIAL RULES:  To obtain any legally-required winners list (after the conclusion of the Challenge) or a copy of these Official Rules, send a self-addressed envelope with the proper postage affixed to:  Health 2.0, LLC, Attn: Health 2.0 Developer Challenges, 650 Delancey Street #221, San Francisco, CA 94107.  Please specify "winners list" or "Official Rules" and the name of the specific Challenge in your request.

© 2011 Health 2.0, LLC.  All rights reserved.