The Frontier of Health 2.0: Full Session

Moderator David Ewing Duncan hosted a panel of speakers including Louis-Philippe Morency from USC, Jonathan Hirsch from Syapse, Adam Gazzaley from UCSF, and Pasquale Fedele of BrainControl. Each speaker demonstrated innovative technology their workplace is developing to include forward-thinking into health care including: robotics, genomics, brain changes, and brain sensors.

The Atlantic: The Frontier of Health 2.0

David Ewing Duncan is a correspondent for The Atlantic and the chief correspondent for NPR Talk’s Biotech Nation. His most recent book is When I’m 164: The new science of radical life extension, and what happens if it succeeds. He also wrote Experimental Man: What One Man’s Body Reveals about His Future, Your Health, and Our Toxic World. He is the founding director of the Center of Life Science Policy at UC Berkeley,a commentator on NPR’s Morning Edition and a contributing editor for many publications including Wired. This was David’s second year hosting the Frontier of Health 2.0 panel, sadly this year he’s not joined by a teddy bear. He spoke on ecogenetics and the interaction of toxins with genetics through analyzing data.

The Future of Personalized Health: UC Berkeley

David’s the author of the Experimental Man, and When I’m 164 about the new science of radical life extension, and what happens if it succeeds. He’s also the Chief Correspondent of public radio’s Biotech Nation; and a columnist for Fortune. Oh, and he also runs the Personalized Health Project and Summit.

The Future of Personalized Health

The tools, devices, sensors and other technologies that will be used to collect and monitor health data and customize it to the user. Going forward, how will genomics, robotics and behavior change fit into personalized health?

Genomics, Proteomics, and DIY DNA

The “Getting to Know You: Genomics Proteomics and DIY DNA” panel took place as part of the Health 2.0 San Francisco 2011 Fall conference and highlighted DNA Guide, 23andme, OpenPCR, and DNA Direct by Medco as some of the most exciting products that can help us understands what’s going on in our genome.

Frontier

The Frontier of Health 2.0: Full Session

Moderator David Ewing Duncan hosted a panel of speakers including Louis-Philippe Morency from USC, Jonathan Hirsch from Syapse, Adam Gazzaley from UCSF, and Pasquale Fedele of BrainControl. Each speaker demonstrated innovative technology their workplace is developing to include forward-thinking into health care including: robotics, genomics, brain changes, and brain sensors.

davidduncan

The Atlantic: The Frontier of Health 2.0

David Ewing Duncan is a correspondent for The Atlantic and the chief correspondent for NPR Talk’s Biotech Nation. His most recent book is When I’m 164: The new science of radical life extension, and what happens if it succeeds. He also wrote Experimental Man: What One Man’s Body Reveals about His Future, Your Health, and Our Toxic World. He is the founding director of the Center of Life Science Policy at UC Berkeley,a commentator on NPR’s Morning Edition and a contributing editor for man ...
fopberk

The Future of Personalized Health: UC Berkeley

David’s the author of the Experimental Man, and When I’m 164 about the new science of radical life extension, and what happens if it succeeds. He’s also the Chief Correspondent of public radio’s Biotech Nation; and a columnist for Fortune. Oh, and he also runs the Personalized Health Project and Summit.

fop

The Future of Personalized Health

The tools, devices, sensors and other technologies that will be used to collect and monitor health data and customize it to the user. Going forward, how will genomics, robotics and behavior change fit into personalized health?

thumbnail_2_8bd87776_v1

Genomics, Proteomics, and DIY DNA

The “Getting to Know You: Genomics Proteomics and DIY DNA” panel took place as part of the Health 2.0 San Francisco 2011 Fall conference and highlighted DNA Guide, 23andme, OpenPCR, and DNA Direct by Medco as some of the most exciting products that can help us understands what’s going on in our genome.