Healthy Circles – Customizing Doctor Patient Interaction

James Mault, Chairman & CEO, Healthy Circles
With fellow ex-Microsoftie Adam Pellegrini and a host of other industry veterans, James has created Healthy Circles. It’s a SaaS-based patient relationship management system that uses all the tools of Web 2.0, and lets providers customize the way they interact with patients. We think it’s a great example of how the new doctor’s office is not just about workflow, but also about connecting with patients. This demo was part of “The Next Generation of Health 2.0 in the Doctor’s Office” panel at the 2011 Health 2.0 conference in San Francisco.

The Next Generation of Health 2.0 in the Doctor’s Office

SaaS and cloud-based medical record products and services are heading aggressively for physician offices. In parallel, the race for meaningful use dollars is on and legacy enterprise vendors are competing with startups offering more modular, lightweight tools across a variety of unplatforms. So who’s going to win in the race to getting EMRs to the 70% of American practices that don’t have them? And what services are needed – is software even enough?

 

Screen shot 2011-11-17 at 10.39.35 AM

Healthy Circles – Customizing Doctor Patient Interaction

James Mault, Chairman & CEO, Healthy Circles With fellow ex-Microsoftie Adam Pellegrini and a host of other industry veterans, James has created Healthy Circles. It’s a SaaS-based patient relationship management system that uses all the tools of Web 2.0, and lets providers customize the way they interact with patients. We think it’s a great example of how the new doctor’s office is not just about workflow, but also about connecting with patients. This demo was part ...
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The Next Generation of Health 2.0 in the Doctor’s Office

SaaS and cloud-based medical record products and services are heading aggressively for physician offices. In parallel, the race for meaningful use dollars is on and legacy enterprise vendors are competing with startups offering more modular, lightweight tools across a variety of unplatforms. So who’s going to win in the race to getting EMRs to the 70% of American practices that don’t have them? And what services are needed – is software even enough?